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Thought's from the Latest Tow Operator Struck Incident.


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Once again a Tow Operator has been struck and killed working along side the very dangerous roadways.

 

I have taken the comments from the Headlines News Story posted earlier in an effort to keep that report devoted to condolences for the loss. We can debate the issue further and yes we should debate this issue while it is fresh. Keep in mind we awaiting further details surrounding this incident.

 

Here is what we have gathered from the initial reports. This was the drivers second day on the job. It was a Friday evening and the incident occurred on southbound 5 Freeway around 8:15 p.m.

 

Questions needing answers and not speculation:

At this time of evening was the sun setting?

Where was the Tow Operator standing when struck?

One report was the tow truck operator was struck

another does not reference the truck being struck.

Add your questions show they may be researched.

 

Some lines of thought from the Tower Down Topic

in the Headlines and Towlines forum.

 

"We as an industry need to stop working in unprotected work zones. Without signage and lane closures we do not have a chance out here. "

 

"The tow truck driver was in the process of towing a broken down vehicle when his truck was struck by the big rig, logs show."

 

"The move over law is just not out there enough, people don't care ."

 

"This section of California’s I-5, towards Gorman and Lebec, is extremely rural, wide, winding and fast traveled."

 

"at 8:30 in the PM, it’s totally pitch-black with no streetlights."

 

"it possible that this operator may have been working/standing near the white-line side when struck by the semi"

 

"I'll suggest that, all the cones, flares, signs, blockers, cops and whatever ... doesn’t negate the fact that working on or near the white-line side is a dangerous place to be."

 

"when there isn’t available assistance in a rural location, it demands that towers be that much more diligent in their actions when working shoulder events."

 

"I am an advocate for OSHA getting belly deep into this industry and mandating that safe operating procedures be initiated."

 

"We are responsible for our own safety. Even then, sometimes we fail. Plan the safest procedures and then abort the plan of it gets too dangerous "

 

 

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Just a few thoughts in regards to the comments copied from the headlines report.

 

It appears Sunset was between 8:15p & 8:25p

From the images I have seen it does not appear the roll back was struck.

We do not have details to whether the tow operator was working alone

without any support. So while we can assume like most of these incidents

they were on their own, we need to wait for the details.

The Move Over Law has had little effect on drivers giving tow ops room to work.

Increasing fines does little good when judges will not uphold this law.

While ones, flares, signs, blockers, cops and whatever ... doesn’t negate the fact

that working on or near the white-line side is a dangerous place to be." It can

certainly lessen the risk of being struck and killed. Waiting 10, 20 30 minutes

for a backup is certainly better than losing ones life. But, this industry just cannot

seem to wrap it's head around the safety procedures when working along side

any roadway.

The industry DOES NOT need OSHA's involvement, the industry needs to develop

a plan of action on it's own and force towers in their states to follow those basic

procedures without government involvement. Bringing a government agency into

this is like bringing TDLR into the industry. How has that worked out?

It all comes down to the Tow Companies taking a harder look at how they respond

to roadside breakdowns. I see far to many tow operator working in the same type

of conditions as the one we are discussing. So, in general this discussion is about

more than one incident where a Tow Op tragically lost their life. It is about reducing

the number of instances to where we are not reporting these on a weekly basis.

 

Please add your thoughts and if you are involved in your state association

What are your thought's in regards to how as a Towing Association you can do more.

 

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Ron ... you asked for a rant, or, a rah rah speech? Well ... here ya' go.

 

No ... I'm not a state association, yet simply, a concerned individual who's worked much of my adult career training police officers and tow truck operators. For 30-plus years, I've been a career instructor and technical writer teaching white-line safety and the TIMs concept for tow operators.

 

I have had my legs broken by an out-of-control vehicle while I worked a highway patrol recovery some 40-year's ago. I know what it's like to being critically injured at the hands of some motorhead because they were driving too fast for conditions in the rain. I know what it's like to think and rethink that incident asking,

 

"What I could have done better to have lessened my on-scene exposure?" 

 

I felt guilty for having totaled my bosses tow truck, but, only because I was there to help serve law enforcement, not because it was my fault. It was at that very moment where I committed myself to learning and practicing on-scene safety. Since then, I have tracked highway related fatalities that go back as far as 1934, with nearly 950-operators killed for varying reasons; as many as 350-of those killed on the highways. 

 

I have written and reported on tow operator fatalities, helped bury many police officer and tow operator friends killed in the line-of-duty to the point I have grown weary of the repeated slaughter. But, I haven't lost my inner-fire with simple hopes that we'll somehow recognize a way to reduce the pandemic of tow operators killed. But, that comes with stirring the emotions of some tow operators and tow business owners who don't give a care about what their doing or how they're going about their daily tasks. 

 

We know that flares, signs, blockers, cops and whatever ... does take extra time, but the very fact of identifying a work-space that says, "HERE I AM", should be worth the time it takes. There are lessons to be learned here people ... we're not reinventing the wheel, but simply demand,

 

"Do what you have to to make yourself seen; don't stand in active traffic lanes and stay OFF the white-line side." 

 

That's no-brainer stuff. How hard can that be?

 

Sure there are incidents where distracted drivers will continue to crash into us working the highways. But, lessons learned from 350-tow operator fatalities has clearly identified that working on or near the white-line side is THE most dangerous place to be. Need I say more?

 

I am a realist that understands that DUI's, texting and motoring stupidity are here to stay. Towers continue to put themselves in harms way. No ... not because of a lack of training, is it too much testosterone, or is it that overflowing macho that says, "Nothin's gonna' happen to me?"

 

Without concern for hurting anyone's sensibilities, tower's ... stop worrying about the cops not being there, state associations not being involved, or those damned non-concerned highway drivers. You have NO control over what they do, but you have every bit of control about where you work and what you do to help save your individual life. It's your professional skills and on-scene processes that you that prayerfully will keep your name from being part of my fatality archives. Take control of your actions and stop worrying about what everyone else is doing. You should be telling yourself ... "Not me, not today", preparing yourself mentally that no punk driver is going to take you out based on your carelessness or complacency. On-scene safety is every operator's choice ... and NO amount of hand-holding or coddling by others will help keep you safe more than your own actions.

 

In a nutshell, the cops aren't helping, the associations haven't stepped up and the motoring public simply doesn't give a crap. To me ... that presents a bleak picture of the industry's future. I will continue to help spread the word of safety and survival where I can. But, I can only pray for your safety. It's that, "lead them to water", kinda' thing.     R

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Randall C. Resch

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Randall.....that is the most sobering and accurate piece of text I have read in a long time ....you are bang on the money !!! 

 

I too in my career  have been hit twice, my son Graham had his leg smashed, we had 2 other guys also injured on seperate occasions, both had life changing injuries,

Additionally we lost long term employee  Terry Booth ......Terry died at the side of a busy road in the middle of the night....witnesses at the inquest testified that his truck was properly positioned with cones out and lit up like a,    quote ... "Christmas tree"   he had a comprehensive training record with all the regular refreshers ...

And STILL it happened  !!!   The woman driver that hit him was DUI and went to jail   ....my point is ...on this occasion all the training he  had did not save him ..

 

I whole heartedly agree with your points about self preservation at the roadside ......

 

Just this morning, on my way to the supermarket ,   I saw a tow truck at the side of the road half on the kerb and half on the carriageway......apart from the beacons on there was no cones or warning signs displayed the operator had no reflective clothing on,  just shorts and tee shirt  and  worst of all,   he was working on the traffic side of the truck ....I stopped and parked my car behind him with the hazard warning lights on....as a bit of warning to other traffic ....

I said to the driver,  don't you have any  hi vis clothing ?    Yes  he said, I forgot to bring it ..

 

This Tow truck is owned and operated by a very good company  and the owner is a long time friend and colleague,  he is very pro active  with safety and training...he will be furious and dissapointed when I advise him what I saw ......

 

.your point about  macho,  testosterone,  it wont happen to me ??.   Case in point !!!     NEVER TAKE THE JOB FOR GRANTED .....NEVER DROP YOUR GUARD .

 

The constant  loss of life at the roadside is an absolute tragedy .....but if 1 life can be spared through increased reflectivity, hi visibility clothing, awareness training....

Then it is worthwhile ....

 

Sorry if I have bored or offended any one  but , self preservation is the key ...no matter what country  or language it is in 

 

John.

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Hi John ... it's always so very exciting to hear from you across the pond. I hope you and your business are doing well. Thanks for your comments and I personally won't apologize for offending other towers when it comes to ... as you've so eloquently described ... "self-preservation". Perhaps that's one of the reasons why this industry is behind the curve is because we don't want to hurt anyone's feelings. Will towers ever wake up? Highway related fatalities are traced back to 1934 and the same old pig headed mistakes and actions have resulted in literally hundreds of towers killed. And, Like me and you John, I'm pretty sure most towers have their own "struck-by" stories to tell ... some non-preventable. Like the over-use and abuse of amber-light on all the time, perhaps the current feeling is ... "Nah ... it's just another tower killed ... glad it's not me." I guess we've grown numb to the root causes that continue to get tower's killed, but I'm interested in the tower you talked with about no safety vest. At some point John, if you do talk with the company's owner, please share what his reaction were.   Best regard.      R.

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Randall C. Resch

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Randall, it's not the "we don't want to hurt anyone's feelings" attitude. It's the "it's never going to happen to me" attitude.

 

If you can tell me what miracle it will take to wake these individuals in the industry up, then I will gladly help promote it.

 

You do realize less the .5 percent of the industry can tell you how many tow operators have loss their lives roadside this year.

 

I estimate that Less than 4% know there was a Tow Op killed this past Friday and as long as it doesn't effect them.

 

They're Good...

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This very discussion clearly demonstrates why towers will keep being killed simply doing their jobs. This forum reaches hundreds of towers daily, if not thousands, yet it is the same half dozen of us that actually respond in a constructive manner. True, Randy and I have bigger pulpits to broadcast messages from thanks to our other work, but it takes more than a couple of writers and instructors to spread the word about taking charge of your own safety.

 

Sadly, it is not just the towing industry that fails to operate safely. If it were not for the fear of OSHA the construction world would still be losing hundreds of lives needlessly. Even there, where OSHA is a real possibility, many smaller companies still cut corners. It is really only the large jobsite, where the project owner is on top od safety, that procedures get followed routinely. Perhaps that is where we need to go in towing, not OSHA per se, although they are already involved in our industry and actively monitor the news for stories of towers killed so they can investigate. Just follow this link for OSHA inspection data related to the towing industry (SIC Code 488410).

 

OSHA SIC 488410 Inspection Data

 

Our state transportation agencies, the folks that own the highway, need to require and enforce proper traffic control measures for towers. They already do it for construction zones, so why not towers? I will tell you why, because we let it happen to ourselves! We have weak state associations, if we have any at all in most states, and we are so damn concerned about offending the police or the motoring public that we let ourselves be abused by our "customers". I hate to call for more government involvement in our industry, but if we don't do something soon ourselves governmental regulations will be forced upon us. Unfortunately, until it is a regulation or law most towers simply will not pay any mind to safety.

 

To paraphrase what Randy said in reply to my post in the other thread, it is not, or should not be about cost. Life safety comes as a priority regardless of cost. As business owners we need to work in the cost of providing a safe work environment, plus a reasonable profit margin, to every job we do.

 

The public could care less about towers, even my closest friends are absent minded about slow down move over, knowing how it could effect my family if I were struck roadside, they still don't see it as important. Knowing that motorists will not react unless they perceive a need to, defining a work zone and using other protective measures is the only way to keep us safe. I am at the point that I am ready to call for a blocker truck program that is operated on behalf of all towers in a given area, something similar to the HELP or HERO patrol trucks. Funded by a mix of public and private money, it would provide a physical barrier for towers in the most dangerous areas. This could also be a revenue source for towers, provide the proper work zone and invoice for it, not that I am saying revenue is more important than safety, but we do need to find ways to fund safety.

 

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Brian, a decade ago members would enter into these discussions and many thought that we could effect the number of roadside deaths. That was a decade ago, since then the number of members entering into these discussions has declined and the number of deaths risen or remained near the annual high.

 

Traffic was really high on the old message board with both members and guests reading topics. However over the last decade that is mainly all they have been doing is reading. While I truly believe that those that read these instances have a greater awareness of the dangers. We have lost a few members to tragic roadside events. For many of us these instances are a constant reminder of the dangers, yet we place ourselves in those situations roadside on nearly a daily basis with traffic wising by at 60, 70, 80 mph (99, 114, 129 kph). Yet we are still out there alone on the roadside, even having extra lights, cones, flares, using non roadside controls. we must still enter that increased danger zone. Even when we think we're not in harms way the danger is present and can find us.

 

After each of these tragic deaths are awareness is raised for a short period and they fade quickly as we do not dwell on that fact that could have been any of us. Companies do not review these deaths, it's even taboo to review them within this online community. Yet, by reviewing them we can all learn how to lower the risk, be that how to position the truck, what extra safety equipment can be implemented, when to call for backup/support, etc.

 

As an industry we fail our members, but more importantly we fail those that we are not reaching. Someone tell me how to reach them and I will work on it. Most do not read the publications, they do not participate online, there company doesn't stress the safety aspects of the job. Generally it's just get the job done. Met a driver just a couple of nights ago, on the job 3 weeks, little or no training, just knew the basics.

 

Just knowing the basics will get you killed. Being a seasoned veteran taking safety for granted will get you killed and sometimes Just being there will get you killed. I know that when I step out of the truck I am in the danger zone, I treat it like a combat zone. I always say I have eye in the back of my head or swivel head but I can get distracted. I listen for the sounds traffic but sometimes there isn't much when a vehicle is upon you quickly.

 

I do find that my concern for others safety at the scene does not lessen my safety. It actually increases the safety at the scene for all as raises the level of awareness. I have on numerous occasions seen officers watching the tow operator doing their job rather than watching the traffic. This places both of them at higher risk, I always ask the officer to keep an eye on traffic and alert me if I need to react.

 

I want to go back through past roadside deaths and learn what the conditions were and where the driver was when the event that claimed their life occurred. But, I have been reminded numerous times that we as an industry do not discuss those aspects as it somehow suggests that tow operator or the company was at fault. That is not what we are suggesting at all, we simply need to be able to relate to other industry professional what can be done to lessen the risk. It appears to me that the 2 largest risks are being between the vehicles and entering the truck. It seems exiting the truck we check the mirror, open the door look and then step out always keeping an eye on traffic. Yet many let their guard down when returning to the truck and turning their back on traffic. I watch my back as I realize that is a point when I am most vulnerable.

 

I hope that more enter into the discussion and we can reach those drivers that are more interested in the appearance of their truck what's on the bed or lift then safety procedures which must be followed. I do not want to see OSHA fining companies because the controls on the truck are not clearly labeled, that's a manufacturer issue. I don't want them harping signage and cones, flares, etc. That adds time to basic roadside hookups that can place a driver at a higher risk. They won't require such things as a blocker unit or law enforcement contact when on scene where there is an increased risk. They'll mandate safety hats and googles,  What is that going to do to lessen the risk of our being struck. OHSA will then focus more on the safety at the facility then roadside because that's often a higher focus for them. Yes, OSHA has saved countless lives in the construction and manufacturing industries with regulations. But, all their current regulations are not going to save a life from a distracted motorist.

 

It's Hazardous Duty and must be treated as Hazardous Duty. My hope is that more care enough to enter into this discussion. But, I know as in the past a few of us will kick this can down the road, while others simply watch. Some Associations will blink, add a note in any training events that do reaching those who are aware. Yet, not reaching those who need the message the most. We may never know, but we should know the details about every roadside death or we cannot lessen that risk of another.

 

I want to compile articles on roadside safety which have appeared in publications or association newsletters over the years. If anyone has written these or can reference them please let us know. If you can provide a link or add the content. Please advise, as this would be a great resource to have in one place. Our Read Only Members & Guest would likely find those of interest and will the rest of us.

 

As you know this isn't something that can be discussed with a few words. This is the venue to go into depth on the subject. My final thought on the subject "Tow Truck Rallies" these rides that towers conduct in memory of a tow operator often bring many towers together. How to expand on that formal or informal gathering of industry professionals is the question. No social media in general isn't reaching them. But those on social media can reach them. The TowForce is with them and care they just don't know it.

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Ron maybe we need to have a M & M session like doctors do after they lose a patient where all info is on the table and no blame is leveled and all is confidential to those in the session. Being able to tell all the details so that operators are aware of what happened and what can be done to have better results. You can do everything right, legal, moral, what ever and still be DEAD. We have to be able to do the job and come home at night, what ever it takes. Sometimes that means saying no to the job, doing it later, or having extra people on hand to complete it safely! Most and I mean most law enforcement is on our side and do what we ask within reason, sometimes they just can't do it at a moments notice. We need to work WITH them and be understanding of the time restraints, and other issues they have as well. Our state troopers are very thin in our state sometimes having only three troopers in a 5 or 6 county area. Sheriff and local police do have more resources at times and are always a great help. Use them when needed!!

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George - - Moore's BP
We'll see you on down the road

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When I propose that OSHA is a solution, I say that because nothing else works to end the senseless deaths and injuries. I am not aware of how many fatalities there have been this year, but how many years has this can been kicked down the road, and how many more years will it continue to be kicked down the road. We as an industry are so afraid to charge for services that are required as it is. Motor clubs would have no choice but to pay for blocker vehicles if they were federally mandated, as would vehicle manufacturers. I think it is fair to say that there is a certain percentage of companies that could care less about their employees, just as it is fair to say that there are companies that care deeply about the people who work in the trenches. How many people across the board would mandate safe working practices and be willing to terminate an employee if they fail to follow all designated protocols. Just as an employee has that attitude that it can not happen to me, so do many companies that blatantly look the other way and just keep rolling the dice hoping that they will get through the night without a critical incident.

 

We as an industry adopting measures has been a colossal failure, on the part of operators to accept responsibility for their safety an well being by not taking needless risks, as well as on the part of leadership to ensure that safe operating practices are implemented. I have NEVER received any formal safety training at any of the companies I have worked for regarding roadside safety. NEVER . I have spent hours being trained on how to complete paperwork as well as account for cash, checks, and debit card disbursements, and how to turn them in.

 

In the meantime the fatality count keeps creeping towards 65 for the year.

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7 hours ago, goodmichael said:

When I propose that OSHA is a solution, I say that because nothing else works to end the senseless deaths and injuries. I am not aware of how many fatalities there have been this year, but how many years has this can been kicked down the road, and how many more years will it continue to be kicked down the road. We as an industry are so afraid to charge for services that are required as it is. Motor clubs would have no choice but to pay for blocker vehicles if they were federally mandated, as would vehicle manufacturers. I think it is fair to say that there is a certain percentage of companies that could care less about their employees, just as it is fair to say that there are companies that care deeply about the people who work in the trenches. How many people across the board would mandate safe working practices and be willing to terminate an employee if they fail to follow all designated protocols. Just as an employee has that attitude that it can not happen to me, so do many companies that blatantly look the other way and just keep rolling the dice hoping that they will get through the night without a critical incident.

 

We as an industry adopting measures has been a colossal failure, on the part of operators to accept responsibility for their safety an well being by not taking needless risks, as well as on the part of leadership to ensure that safe operating practices are implemented. I have NEVER received any formal safety training at any of the companies I have worked for regarding roadside safety. NEVER . I have spent hours being trained on how to complete paperwork as well as account for cash, checks, and debit card disbursements, and how to turn them in.

 

In the meantime the fatality count keeps creeping towards 65 for the year.

You hit on a few of the issues, mainly the fact that the industry does not charge what are service are worth, as if we are afraid of losing the customer. Sadly, you are also  orrect that some owners could care less about safety and generally both owners and employees feel like it won't happen to them.

 

I am not again OSHA doing their job, we need someone to force most owners into thinking about safety, it is just that they have also "kicked the can" down the road by passing the responsibility of tow operator safety to other Federal Agencies, which are not really experts in workplace safety.

 

Now, ideally rather than a Federal Agency, I would like to see a voluntary compliance board of sorts, like ISO 9001 that manufacturers have but for and governed by, towing industry stakeholders. Being "board certified" would open access to law enforcement contracts -real contracts not just the current tow list model- as well as other work. I want to make it so towers that are not board certified would not be able to work on the highways, period. Same for mobile mechanics, tire shops and anyone else servicing motor vehicles roadside.

 

It is frustrating that most company training is exactly as you described, more about invoicing and paperwork to assure payment than safe working procedures. When towers do train, and this is not a knock again any of the industry trainers, the focus training on whiz bang procedures for complex recovery not stuff that will keep an employee alive every day.

 

The safety part seems to be ignored by the attendees as well, not just worksite safety but even safe capacities of equipment. I can't tell you how many seasoned operators I speak to that have no clue what the actual ratings are on their truck. Perhaps the most common is winch capacity, many veteran heavy drivers wholeheartedly believe they have 50 ton winches on their 50 ton wrecker!

 

I have even caught major manufacturers exceeding safe working capacities or incorrectly using rigging during live demos, not so much recently but it has happened. These are the folks that are leaders in the industry, and if they don't care then why should the rest of the industry?

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Good Michael and Brian have valuable comments regarding the lack of a full safety-mentality in the workplace.Their combined comments from their latest posts resonates on what issues I believe creates and extends untimely fatalities. I believe Brian's direct statement indicated, "It is frustrating that most company training is exactly as you described, more about invoicing and paperwork to assure payment than safe working procedures. When towers do train, and this is not a knock again any of the industry trainers, the focus training on whiz bang procedures for complex recovery not stuff that will keep an employee alive every day."

 

I believe the number one cause of operator deaths is towers working, walking and standing in a live traffic-lane that's on or near the white-line. Formal training by big-box training entities focus too much on product demonstration, how bigger, better, and the baddest heavier equipment can make more money, or how to go after those invoiced dollars. With no disrespect to trainers, vendors and manufacturers, little of their demonstrations or course's focus has anything to do with the errors, mistakes, or negative factors that create tow operator fatality. It may be a reversal of information, but a great percentage of on-highway strikes may have been prevented if the tower did not place themselves in harm's way. Similar to, a large percentage of towers are killed in preventable traffic accidents where the operator's driving actions were the cause of fatal crashes to include not wearing seat-belts. I believe that only a small percentage of operators were killed by equipment failure leading me to think that the entire spectrum of safety focus is lost in translation, little to no retention, and that "I don't give a damn", attitude. But, regardless as to what training (if any) a tow employee receives, it's message of safety and survival in in the mind of the beholder. All the safety training, formal certificates, or years in the trenches do nothing if an individual fails to apply the messages safety training represents. 

 

White-line safety training typically isn't a voluntary thing, but oftentimes a mandate by an agency's contract. The numbers of tow operator fatality are staggering and my statistics (1934 to current) incorporates a total of approximately 954-lost souls for any number of reasons including DUI, Tow Truck vs. Train, Shootings, Traffic Incidents, Ejected -No Seat-belts, operator involved industrial accidents and others. Note: I believe there is NO completely accurate fatality list of towers injured or killed, but, there are many lists floating around ... only to simply suggest that fatality rates among tow operators far exceed the fatality rates of other first responders. I've recorded as many as 313-tow operators killed working white-line highway incidents. There's plenty of evidence to clearly show that whatever white-line strategies as taught to industry professionals aren't working ... there's got to be a better way.  

 

When it comes to tow operator instruction, I know my audience, but, I feel that the bottom-line of training reverts back to EVERY individual tower and their individual attitude towards heeding the word of training. How each tower applies their actions to the message of safety (at EVERY scenario_ is THEIR responsibility, NOT to blame the boss, NOT to blame a lack of training, NOT to blame the cops, and NOT to blame distracted, DUI, and head-up ass motorists.  FACT: The answer to the latter is simple ... drunks and distracted motorists are here to stay. Tow Operators MUST be smart about staying focused on-scene.  Sure, it's the industry's responsibility to provide the training tools to every tow operator, but how they apply it is the biggest component of survival. There's too much finger pointing going on, but, towers must take responsibility for their own actions when they drive and when they're boots-to-the-ground.

 

I believe that on-highway protocol via TIM and the highway patrol must change to where traffic gets slowed or stopped for instances that tow trucks prepare to load; perhaps conducting more traffic breaks when situations call for such. Law should be changed where untrained or unqualified tow operators cannot work the highway until they show evidence of an approved safety course. I believe that all tow trucks for highway/freeway service patrol and rotation tow operators should be equipped with a large, visible arrow-boards. Laws should be changed requiring towers to place cones/triangle/flares at every incident in a manner required by FMCSA § 392.22 Emergency signals; stopped commercial motor vehicles. 

 

As we move forward, I too am watching what's being mentioned here. I'd really like to see more of the industry's heavy hitters get involved in this conversations, especially from the industry's side, the insurance community, and that of the varying tow associations. For 85-years now, the towing and recovery industry has FAILED in delivering ways to increase tow operator safety. Anyone worried about operator retention should be worried as to where the next generation of tow truck operators will come from if all they see is an industry that doesn't care.    R

Brian ... let's talk about ISO ratings for the industry?

Randall C. Resch

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I believe that on-highway protocol via TIM and the highway patrol must change to where traffic gets slowed or stopped for instances that tow trucks prepare to load; perhaps conducting more traffic breaks when situations call for such. Law should be changed where untrained or unqualified tow operators cannot work the highway until they show evidence of an approved safety course. I believe that all tow trucks for highway/freeway service patrol and rotation tow operators should be equipped with a large, visible arrow-boards. Laws should be changed requiring towers to place cones/triangle/flares at every incident in a manner required by FMCSA § 392.22 Emergency signals; stopped commercial motor vehicles. 

 

AMEN!

George - - Moore's BP
We'll see you on down the road

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