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Guest Tow inquiry

CTTA vs. WreckMaster

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Guest Tow inquiry

I relocated to Tx from Ca; I had gained my heavy duty level 6 training through CTTA in CA. I’ve worked extremely hard over the years to gain experience and training. But, I was recently told by my new boss that my CTTA certification and training had no merit outside of CA. because it was not from WreckMaster (nationally recognized).

 

My question is can the training I received via CTTA be compared or equivalent to training received via WreckMast? If not then can someone explain the differences? (As side from the fact that CTTA is in Ca) 

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Call Wreckmaster and they can discuss it with you. What I understand is CTTA is more California situational centric while Wreckmaster is broader taking in scenarios you would see anywhere in north america. Give them a call- they are super nice folks and have always been great to work with for us.


Mark

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From California ... Hey Guest Inquiry ... Lucky you ... you've escaped all the crap California has to offer, except for the great weather.

 

Because you list no information on your profile, I don't know if this is some corporate spying, but I'll refer you to the proper persons with information other than CTTA or WreckMaster people. I just now called, Tommy Anderson, Director at SW Tow Operators Association, in Texas, regarding your question.

 

Tommy says, "Unfortunately, your boss is correct." As far as California's wrecker criteria, your CTTA heavy certificate is a good only IF you're in California, but TDLR has Texas specific requirements for Texas tow operators.

 

Texas Regulations & Licensing TDLR:   https://www.tdlr.texas.gov/towing/towrules.htm

 

I refer you to Tommy Anderson at 214-202-4936. Give Tommy a call and he can tell you what you need to attain Texas certification and testing. All training is good training, but, all programs are NOT recognized by TDLR.       R.

 

 


Randall C. Resch

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Guest Guest tow inquiry

Rreschran.. thanks a lot. Not corporate spying. Just having trouble getting my boss to recognize the skills I have. I appreciate the information. 

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OK ... understood. CTTA is one of the leading training entities in the towing and recovery industry as is WreckMaster. Both are recognized by the California HIghway Patrol on their tow service agreement. Your boss can go to the CHP's Tow Service Agreement and to the very last page to see those training entities accepted by the CHP. Here's the link: https://www.chp.ca.gov/ResearchAndPlanningSectionSite/Documents/2019-2020_TSA.pdf 

 

For what it's worth, I have been an accepted light-duty for CHP for 19-years and I too am on that same list. The CHP will not accept any training entity without having a "hands-on" module (skills presentation).

 

Note:  If I was the tow company owner and you came to me with a CTTA Level 6 certificate that wasn't expired, I'd be inclined to give your application a closer look. You still have to comply with TDLR's criteria that won't recognize the CTTA certificate. Give Tommy Anderson a call ... you're welcome.


Randall C. Resch

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Hey Mr. Quinn ... I don't know why Texas doesn't accept a CTTA certificate for their drivers as I don't have any reason to inquire. TDLR has its own standards and requirements fro tow operator certification and permiting. Here's the number I have for TDLR questions - (800) 803-9202.     R.


Randall C. Resch

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I agree with Grumps, especially between California and Texas, both of which have great towing industries with the right attitudes towards professionalism. This would be a great step in the right direction for a uniform base of knowledge for tow operators , at least in states that are regulated.

 

Now, one thing I can offer as a Wreck Master 4/5, and coming directly from Justin Cruse's mouth during a recent interview, Wreck Master has separated their training from their certification process, meaning you no longer must take their leveled courses in order to gain their certification. You can register through the Wreck Master Partner Program and take their certification exam at any level you wish, and if you successfully pass you will earn the corresponding level of WM certification. Perhaps this is a way to take your CTTA training and gain a nationally recognized certification credential?

 

You could also do the same with the Towing and Recovery Association of America's National Driver Certification Program. There are no educational prerequisites to sit for the TRAA exam, only requirement is you complete them in order so light then heavy duty. This also would allow you to take advantage of your CTTA training while gaining a nationally recognized certification.

 

My one word of caution, having worked with Southwest Tow Operators for several years now, Texas is quite different than California so some of the information taught in a CTTA course may not directly translate into Texas policy and procedure. The TDLR certifications are mostly about Texas law and accepted practices, so although the principles of safe wrecker operation are the same worldwide you may still benefit from taking all the Texas courses as if you were an entry level operator. Besides, refresher training is always a good thing to help remind us of the basics we often forget about with age and experience.

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spot on guys I had a great talk with Tommy yesterday the wheels are turning slow but movement is great !!!!

 


sigwedotows.jpg

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While I agree with mist of what's presented here, a certificate of any kind, without a solid hands-on module, means nothing more than the paper it's printed on and regardless under what name it's printed under. Texas tow operators have Bobby Tuttle and CIRT to help them gain TDLR approval because his course is specific to Texas law.   R


Randall C. Resch

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26 minutes ago, rreschran said:

While I agree with mist of what's presented here, a certificate of any kind, without a solid hands-on module, means nothing more than the paper it's printed on and regardless under what name it's printed under. Texas tow operators have Bobby Tuttle and CIRT to help them gain TDLR approval because his course is specific to Texas law.   R

I agree there must be hands-on practical training in addition to classroom knowledge. The certification process should be independent of the training process, although I do also agree that for a complete certification there should be a practical demonstration of the knowledge gained during the training program. That said, anything that gets towers in front of learning materials is a win with me right now!

 

In an ideal world I would love to see an independent certification program, completely apart from all training providers, that really tests a towers knowledge and abilities. Picture a "final exam" if you will, complete with a mock incident that you must successfully remediate before being granted certification and license to work alone. A complete program would also have continuing education modules, both classroom and hands-on as well.

 

I will draw from my experience as a Pennsylvania school bus driver for what I want to model. To obtain your school bus license in PA you must first obtain the proper class of CDL with passenger endorsement, then attend and complete a 20 hour school bus course which has both classroom and in bus portions. Then you must complete a minimum number of hours actually working as a school bus driver annually to maintain your school bus license as well as complete a 10 hour refresher every 4 years -which includes 3 hours in bus time with an instructor. The concept is to make sure you are practicing your skills to keep sharp not just keeping a paper certificate and driving once every few months or years.

 

Same concept with our State Safety Inspection Mechanic certifications. You must take class and practical education, demonstrate hands-on proficiency plus recertify every 4 years with specific continuing education and a written test. Also, the State Police vehicle fraud inspectors do random audits and watch you conduct a real inspection, fail to do it properly and you could be suspended.

 

If we as towers had to have annual check rides, i.e. practical demonstration of our basic skill set as well as industry segment specific (incident management, light duty service, etc) continuing education there would be a huge impact on safety as well as general competency among towers. This is basic professionalism and is a must if we are to mature this industry.

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OK, if calling a few members out it what it takes to get more input into these subjects. Then the time has come to do just that as I see little to nothing of genuine value on other forms of social media. Seriously nothing has replaced the discussion found on a message board. When and if they do get started, it's like "squirrel" and they're over.

 

Where is @JustinCruse @Blkwill @Kurt Wilson and I'll add more as I have time. Gotta Run...

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