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rreschran

Re: Working Roll-overs With Carriers

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I'm working on a carrier project that for a long time has been a stupid debate that suggests flatbed carriers AREN'T recovery trucks. To that I say say, "rubbish". A skilled, well-trained, professional tow operator can work most wrecks and recoveries using a carrier, and especially true for carriers that are outfitted with Side-Pullers. To that .. the California Highway Patrol, in this modern day and age of advancements in carrier design, accessories and training, still prohibit (by contract) carriers to be used for recoveries. I believe that law enforcement hasn't been shown what carriers can do in the hands of a skilled operator. I'm not talking about recoveries that require lift, excessive snatch-blocking, or long-lengths of cable. And, because the manufacturers say they won't warranty, guarantee, or recommend carriers used for recovery, law enforcement takes their word as gospel. Isn't it time that manufacturers and state tow associations come forward to demonstrate that carriers oftentimes are the better truck for the job?  Bye the way, I actively teach CHP tow operators and FSP roll-over techniques using a flatbed carrier, especially for those cops repeatedly forget to request a wrecker and the carrier is the first "tow truck" to arrive on scene. Thoughts? Opinions?    R


Randall C. Resch

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Our LE people usually request carriers first without regard for damage. (When a wrecker would do) Having said that I have tried to educate them about that request, tell me what is wrong don't tell me what YOU think I need. Let me make the choice of equipment.


George - - Moore's BP
We'll see you on down the road

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We rarely are told much upon dispatch.  Just that PD is calling us to an address for one vehicle after a crash... or something along those lines.  If we get more info than that we are lucky, and if we do its usually inaccurate or not reliable.   For a typical crash we roll a wrecker and a bed.    Sometimes we show up for one vehicle and come home with multiple as the officers don't realize that others involved weren't driveable, etc.  And plenty of times, we only need one truck, but I prefer to have the extra set of eyes on scene watching our backs.   I bill for what was needed to complete the jobs, so there is plenty of times that we roll two trucks but only bill for one.  If any sort of recovery work is needed, we handle it with a wrecker typically.

Edited by ESC

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when i was towing i use to befriend the cops and chit chat a little if there was time and the area was safe . i would explain a few simple things and reasons why we do things . i noticed this starting to pay off the more i did this . 1 night we had a stolen car chase and crash . the cops called for the tow and said bring the extra cable . i was so glad they did this as i was able to use the 100ft length of cable along with my bed and 50ft on the bed winch to keep my self on hard pack and get the car to me and loaded up .

 

also the fire department guys were not cutting the battery cables but the main engine & trans wiring harnesses and costing the insurance people to spend more than needed or total a car out . we started showing them were and what to cut and not cut and how to cut the wire 1 time to make it so you can hold it to power up yet be cut of power .


ex-tow truck operator . ex- auto mechanic . just a nice guy trying to make a living and enjoy life .

1987 k30 chevy 1ton 4x4 built from scratch truck as my daily driver - work truck .

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Learned to do recovery work (including rollovers) in a carrier, and was in a carrier 90% of the time working for my old man when I first got into the business.  Now if the equipment was MINE, I'd be very picky about what operator I would send out to do recovery work regardless of the equipment, but probably more picky if sending them in a carrier, with the belief that it's easier to damage them if you're not careful.

 

Steel deck, removable side rails, side-puller pulley at the end of the deck...and a trailer attachment for the stinger...that FL60 with the 21' Chevron took care of just about every call I ever ran.

 

Richard

Edited by someotherplace

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OK ... great answers, so let's make the recovery more challenging by changing the scenario. When time is NOT a factor, the vehicle is totally burned, or a stolen recovery with no tires and wheels is five-miles off a dirt road, what choice of truck do you prefer based on ease and security of load. I have my preferences because I'm a carrier guy ... what are your preferences and why?  Let's show the new guys some old tricks.      R.


Randall C. Resch

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IMO your combined criteria just ruled out everything but a carrier; might be tougher to get a carrier to it vs. a wrecker, but no wheels?  A wrecker w/dollies is gonna have a tough time safely bringing that load back out to the road.  If the terrain is rough enough, you're gonna high-center the dollies at some point and that ain't good.  Even at full pinch between the bars you have what, about 6-8" of clearance?

 

Richard

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