Quantcast
Jump to content
Orcas Tow

First day wit GoJaks

Recommended Posts

I have never in my 30 years towing had Gojaks, always used skates to load locked up vehicles, skate on skate for transition on deck, windshield washer solvent mixed with Dawn dishwashing liquid for lube going off deck, sometimes pushing truck out from under vehicle when unloading, etc... I came upon a used set of Gojaks & thought it might make my job easier, loaded a 2019 locked up Range Rover today & had nothing but difficulty with the Gojaks making the transition up the deck, finally gave up on them & used good old skates. Just didn't seem to be the easier way loading on a deck. Any tips/suggestions or send them down the road? Thanks.

IMG_3875.JPG

IMG_3876.JPG

IMG_3877.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice effort, however not the intended use for Gojaks. They don't like bumps and they don't like rocks. Also, as tough as they appear the Gojaks can be damaged fairly easy. I notice also that you did not lock the foot peddle down. I highly recommend doing so, as body damage to the vehicle could occur if the vehicles wheels were at and angle or not locked straight. The primary use for Gojacks are to maneuver a vehicle from a location and or spin the vehicle around. I have used them extensively in the past when doing Private Property Impounds. Since we do fewer of those types of tows I no longer carry a set of them. But, they still a valuable access if you can justify carrying them around on the truck. We have a couple of sets in the garage for moving vehicles around in there. That is an asset there for sure. Thanks for sharing...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, they came with this truck hard mounted, never saw a real need for them so I removed them from the truck & put them in the shop collecting dust. Had this locked up Range Rover so thought Id give it a shot. Will stick them in the shop back under the bench:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

skip almost all of the stuff you said in the first post and try p.b. blaster in a spray can . the stuff dry's up in under 10 min driving down the road so no long term slick bed to slip on . but the tires hit the stuff and slide like a hot knife on butter . one day i was playing around and found the tires would almost 100% go the path of the sprayed p.b. blaster on the bed even . i used it for years after my old boss showed me the trick and boy does it work good . never used skates or gojacks . keep a eye open for the parts stores when its on sale and stock up . put 1 can in each door pocket so you don't need to run around the truck for it . and toss a extra can or 2 in the back of the cab for when you run out .

 

i will admit wd-40 is even better but you must wash that stuff off the bed .

Edited by sweetk30

ex-tow truck operator . ex- auto mechanic . just a nice guy trying to make a living and enjoy life .

1987 k30 chevy 1ton 4x4 built from scratch truck as my daily driver - work truck .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a body shop have a AWD Mercedes on go jacks a while back and wanted it towed to dealer for a no start, no shift out of park issue. Went about like Orcas, not impressed.


George - - Moore's BP
We'll see you on down the road

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a set of 4 at the shop and that's where they spend most of their time. As you've discovered, skates are the way to go with vehicles stuck in park. The only time we really use them is when they're street parked or in a tight lot, we can push them into a spot to load it straight on the deck. If we get to that point though we have to get someone from the shop to bring them out, but this way you have 4 skates and a helper to push.

 

Or you can go the ultra easy route and just wheel lift and dolly it, then you don't have to push or drag it.20180313_195430.thumb.jpg.ce5c5a78129fd12ed5d5e9866346dee6.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by dperone
Edit picture

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, dperone said:

We have a set of 4 at the shop and that's where they spend most of their time. As you've discovered, skates are the way to go with vehicles stuck in park. The only time we really use them is when they're street parked or in a tight lot, we can push them into a spot to load it straight on the deck. If we get to that point though we have to get someone from the shop to bring them out, but this way you have 4 skates and a helper to push.

 

Or you can go the ultra easy route and just wheel lift and dolly it, then you don't have to push or drag it.20180313_195430.thumb.jpg.ce5c5a78129fd12ed5d5e9866346dee6.jpg

 

 

 

Thank you & agreed. Dollies were the first 10 miles of this tow, the last 100 were on the flatbed due to the logistics of my location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally don't like these kinds of body-shop rollers for tow truck and carrier purposes. I've experienced a car on these kinds of accessories as a potential, dangerous roll-away, a driver who blew out his back trying to push a loaded vehicle, or, having to pay to repair a butt-dent or palm-print as a result of trying to push a vehicle from a parking spot. I also paid for a driver's injuries after a slip and fall by another spraying lubricants onto a carrier's deck.  When looking at those, "what-if", scenarios they present,  I prefer to use dollies and skates.Each of the examples mentioned all were either the result of a Worker's Comp claim or a small-claims suit for driver inflicted damage.  R.


Randall C. Resch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, rreschran said:

I personally don't like these kinds of body-shop rollers for tow truck and carrier purposes. I've experienced a car on these kinds of accessories as a potential, dangerous roll-away, a driver who blew out his back trying to push a loaded vehicle, or, having to pay to repair a butt-dent or palm-print as a result of trying to push a vehicle from a parking spot. I also paid for a driver's injuries after a slip and fall by another spraying lubricants onto a carrier's deck.  When looking at those, "what-if", scenarios they present,  I prefer to use dollies and skates.Each of the examples mentioned all were either the result of a Worker's Comp claim or a small-claims suit for driver inflicted damage.  R.

Agreed, I thought Id give them a chance to see if they were worthy of keeping. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have already stated... They are great for smooth surfaces and to reposition or 'stage' a vehc. prior to towing. I (we) never go onto the bed with them. Having a service truck bring them to a site is our procedure so there are 2 people present. This highly reduces risk, damage, injury, etc.  Good luck in the future. Stay safe.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They work great with the flatbed, but only if the vehicle is on a hard smooth surface that is fairly level AND you have some starter ramps to transition onto the deck. We have been using them for years this way, just need to know when they will work or when skates are the better tool to get the job done.

IMG_1653.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Welcome to TowForce.net

    Wanting to join the rest of our members?

    Feel free to sign up today.

×
×
  • Create New...