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Towing an AWD on wheel lift?

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I have to go 200 miles from home to pick up a traverse and equinox, they have couplers in rear differential to engage it for AWD function...has anyone wheel lift towed one of these that far? I have dollies so I could take them to be safe...

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I have to go 200 miles from home to pick up a traverse and equinox, they have couplers in rear differential to engage it for AWD function...has anyone wheel lift towed one of these that far? I have dollies so I could take them to be safe...
I wouldn't do it. We dont go over 30 miles on them.

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As I see it, it's not worth the taking a chance as there may already be an issue.

Also, the bearings in the dollies will likely heat up and fail on such a long trip.

 

I suggest you confirm this is an AWD model, it's about 50/50 chance it is only FWD. Been There Done That...

 

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As I see it, it's not worth the taking a chance as there may already be an issue.
Also, the bearings in the dollies will likely heat up and fail on such a long trip.
 
I suggest you confirm this is an AWD model, it's about 50/50 chance it is only FWD. Been There Done That...
 
Exactly

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Thanks for the input, I did check, it is AWD. Being towed for check engine light (timing issue) I didn't give the bearings on the dollies a thought (outside from checking and greasing before trip)  

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What size are the wheel on your dollies 4.80 or 5.40?

 

Not sure even that will make enough difference on a 200 mile trip.

Maybe someone with experience in this distance on a dolly can advise.

Possibly speeds at or under 55mph with the larger tire size...

It's not for me, I have enough problem with dollies.

So, I would find another way

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On ‎2‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 11:45 PM, quentinbell9 said:

ab57e5c55cb5e1d3820a38568d1de23f.jpg


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Just got 'er done. Ahead of the pictured torque tube is a bolt on u joint yoke. 4 15mm bolts and a ratchet strap to hold the shaft steady, I was on my way...

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Best bet is always disconnecting driveshaft.However we have towed all wheel drives over 1000 miles without incident.The same tires and bearings are used on boat and utility trailers.Good tires with spares just in case and properly greased bearings and not speeding or overheating tires.


Kevin's American Towing Service
Ph: 631-654-8811

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I'll respectfully disagree; some very light duty trailers might use the same size tires but generally these are garden type trailers not meant for highway duty.  Even small boats, jet skis, etc. use a taller tire than a 4.80 (or even 5.70's).  When your tire is that small the bearings are turning at a ridiculous speed on the highway, which is why the dolly user manual suggests a maximum speed of 50mph, ruling out freeway use.  I know people ignore this but I also know a lot of people that find themselves with blown out dolly tires and damaged vehicles from the debris.

 

Absolutely do agree though with staying on top of dolly condition.  For those that don't often use them I see lots of dry rotted tires, seriously underinflated as even a good dolly tire loses air rapidly compared to a large tire, bearings never been greased, bearing dust caps missing, etc.  Those are worst case scenario when you start talking about long distances or high speeds.

 

Back to the original question though I'm siding with the others, that is too far for dollies.  Flatbed, trailer, or some way to disconnect driveline when possible.

 

Richard

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I dont mind people disagreeing, I mind when people who havent done it give information without experiencing it.I towed a Honda crv 89 miles 2 days ago tires didnt even get warm.4.80x8 Traverse isnt heavy in back so not alot of pressure on bearings and tires.Now a full size pickup I probably wouldnt do it.


Kevin's American Towing Service
Ph: 631-654-8811

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I still annoyed.Dollies tires are load range C @ 90lbs, boat trailers and pop up campers use load range B @ 60lbs.Any driver worth their salt would use dollies with properly inflated tires in good condition and properly greased bearings .My tires lose about 1 to 2 lbs a month.I am giving advice from real life experience check out DeLorean in my other post.


Kevin's American Towing Service
Ph: 631-654-8811

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2 hours ago, Kjband13oc said:

I still annoyed.Dollies tires are load range C @ 90lbs, boat trailers and pop up campers use load range B @ 60lbs.Any driver worth their salt would use dollies with properly inflated tires in good condition and properly greased bearings .My tires lose about 1 to 2 lbs a month.I am giving advice from real life experience check out DeLorean in my other post.

The trailer tires are almost always considerably taller which means the bearings are turning WAY less RPM's.

 

Not sure why you feel like you can claim I haven't any experience; I've dollied uncountable vehicles and even with properly maintained dollies (I'm a bit fanatical about it) I've noticed bearings and tires getting warmer than I would like on short trips, and believe me I do check 'em.

 

Your experience may be different, that's great; but you're way out of line making assumptions about me.  All I offered was a different perspective so there's no need for any hostility.  Go on and you do you, I'll do me...

 

Richard

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Sorry Didnt mean to sound hostile.40 years experience ,should count for something when giving advice. I still have my old steel dollies same tires same bearings.New York to Florida numerous times.Made nice money too.My hubs dont get hot sometimes in warmer temperatures tires get warm.sorry again didnt mean to come off angry and hostile.


Kevin's American Towing Service
Ph: 631-654-8811

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Keep those dollies cause mine get hot after a few miles at 45+ mph. I am going to put the caps with zerks on them and these grease them more regularly. See if that makes a difference, years ago we just repacked them. How days the zerks make more sense, until someone drives your truck and hits them. I remember the moon caps, I took them off when in use and others tore them up. Anyone old enough to remember that kinda thing...

 

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I still have my moon caps dont have any chrome left though.Dolly bearings should be packed at least at regular intervals with high temp grease ,I use synthetic .The grease is used to not only to lubricate but also to dissipate heat from bearings to hub.Dried out grease or bot enough grease is recipe for disaster.Tires should be checked weekly for proper pressure and replaced when cracking or dry rotting starts.


Kevin's American Towing Service
Ph: 631-654-8811

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On 3/21/2018 at 3:51 PM, Kjband13oc said:

Sorry Didnt mean to sound hostile.40 years experience ,should count for something when giving advice. I still have my old steel dollies same tires same bearings.New York to Florida numerous times.Made nice money too.My hubs dont get hot sometimes in warmer temperatures tires get warm.sorry again didnt mean to come off angry and hostile.

No worries.  Experience does count and maybe I misread your comments for something they weren't, maybe not, either way water under the bridge.

 

I'm with Ron, keep those dollies; they're serving you better than whatever it is we're buying these days!

 

Richard

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I always use the flatbed for freeway tows but have used dollies for up to 75 mile tows when in a pinch. I towed a Range Rover sport behind the flatbed with the rear on "In The Ditch Dollies" with 4.80 tires & aluminum wheels a couple weeks ago at 60 mph for about 60 miles. The dolly hubs were hardly warm, granted it was a cool evening & I use synthetic grease.

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Your my hero .A man after my own heart.Then again we also do things to make it happen in real world.These dollies" itd" with me have been to Florida from Ny.Dollies have to pass certain tests to be allowed on highway.So there is not any reason properly maintained that they cant be used long distance.


Kevin's American Towing Service
Ph: 631-654-8811

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