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Possible Fentanyl Exposure - 09.13.20 (CA)

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4 hospitalized, including police and tow truck driver, after possible fentanyl exposure.

 

SAN FRANCISCO - Two police officers, a tow truck driver, and a DUI suspect were transported to the hospital Sunday following what authorities believe was exposure to the powerful opioid fentanyl.

 

Officials responded to a report of a possible DUI driver on the south end of the Golden Gate Bridge, according to Andrew Barclay with the California Highway Patrol. They say the vehicle had crashed by the time officers were on the scene.

 

An officer approached the vehicle, found the driver passed out, and then got inside to put the car in park before being overcome by a chemical, officials said.  

 

A second officer and a tow truck driver pulled the disoriented officer out of the vehicle and administered Narcan, a nasal spray that can treat a narcotic overdose in an emergency situation.

 

The suspect was also given Narcan and transported to the hospital. 

 

As a precaution for minor exposure, the second officer and the tow truck driver were given Narcan and transported for treatment as well.

 

The status of their condition was not immediately available.  

 

While officials believe the exposure was to fentanyl, an investigation is underway and the cause has not yet been determined.

 

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Preventing Emergency Responders’ Exposures to Illicit Drugs

 

With the increased level of Heroin on the streets these days, much of it is laced with Fentanyl. This increases the risk to those responding to an overdose or under the influence. Take note of this and pass it on if you have not already. While is is nothing new, the awareness has become heightened as the number of incidents involving responders has increased. Even Tow Truck Operators are at Risk and should always wear gloves when entering a vehicle to be towed. The simple act of reaching in to turn the vehicle off can cause exposure as often air is blowing out the vents which could pose as a hazard.

 

Here is a Topic created with further information. "Use Caution Be Safe"

 

Preventing Emergency Responders’ Exposures to Illicit Drugs

https://www.towforce.net/topic/10984-preventing-emergency-responders’-exposures-to-illicit-drugs/

 

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First Responder Call a couple of years back People laying in a yard.  Fentanyl and cooking meth........Nasty site  The smell from a distance was enough to bring in HazMat Gear. Some did not make it...  Yes Carry Narcan.  Besafe


hookritesig.jpeg

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Great topic … HUGE liability. If I remember correctly, Grumps was a military corpsman trained-in sucking chest wounds, blow-out packs and  Narcan events. He was specifically TRAINED in field-recognition and symptoms of injured person’s down. But, most towers aren’t typically trained to recognize these kinds of events as it's not required of the job description. Towers, can you tell the difference between a person having a massive heart attack, a grand mall seizure, an opioid episode, or if they’re just passed-out drunk?

 

I believe Narcan is a good choice for self-carry if it’s for that right-now emergency use on one’s self or that of your team, but there’s huge “vicarious liability” where seven states won’t protect the untrained person if there were an unintended accidental death. What if the product was stored in a tow truck's interior and exposed to temps over 77-degrees? What if the product was expired beyond two-years? In today’s litigious society, it’s really sad to even have to consider trying to help save someone else’s life, but part of initiating lifesaving procedures means you may have to enter an already compromised environment like a garage or a car’s interior.

 

Going forward, and for safety's sake, I recommend tower's wear industrial grade N95 masks and/or respirators on calls. Since ya' hafta' wear masks for the Covid anyhow, that's a process that's easy to follow. Don't simply wade into any vehicle's interior if you don't have to. And, as an added level of personnel protection, ionce you're trained, why not carry Narcan in your shirt pocket for those unannounced emergency exposures? This is a decision that tow owners should understand all complications and liabilities of emergency care for their personnel or if administered to another individual during a right-now emergency.

 

If it’s your intent to carry Narcan, I suggest getting trained by some recognized source.  For insight as to recognition and leads toward training, Google the words, “Narcan video training” and choose any of the many videos. Another good source of training, perhaps your company could host a class for first responders asking your local fire-department's trainer, paramedic supervisor, or hospital emergency room to teach a class? It's only a matter of time before you're exposed. Don't hesitate ... Get Trained.         R.    


Randall C. Resch

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I worked a wreck 2 weeks back that had a Covid  Positive driver that did not follow orders and stay in place for 14 days . Before we got out of the truck I ask the Question about Covid and got a Yes Answer. We staged until the Driver was gone. No One else was in the vehicle... I sprayed the vehicle with some Disinfectant that we use No one entered the vehicle  Hook and Book  Stored it away from the normal storage ........We all have been ok  ......... 


hookritesig.jpeg

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2 hours ago, rreschran said:

 

I believe Narcan is a good choice for self-carry if it’s for that right-now emergency use on one’s self or that of your team,

That is my main reason and intention for carrying it. Self preservation from a accidental exposure. And while I certainly agree there has to be a level of training in regards to carrying and using it, The real nice thing about Narcan is even if it is administered during a false overdose, It does not cause any adverse effects other than slight sinus pressure, headache and nausea. It is a real good "safe, not sorry" product. As far as blasting some complete stranger with a dose because you think they are in an overdose situation, I really feel that if you are not sure about what might be ailing them, You should best leave it to the professionals and call 911.

And yes Mr. Resch, I was trained as a combat medic. 


PROFESSIONAL TOWING & RECOVERY IS NOT JUST A JOB.. IT IS A LIFESTYLE

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Hello Mr. Rite ... what was the spray products name? Smart of you to question about the Covid. That's good heads up.               R

 

Edited by rreschran

Randall C. Resch

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Thanks for passing on your information and the product website to the troops. 

 

Just for my knowledge ... do you apply any fees for disenfecting services, or is that a process as you conduct biz?     R.


Randall C. Resch

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UPDATED:

 

SAN FRANCISCO - Five law enforcement and a tow truck driver hospitalized after possible fentanyl exposure on the Golden Gate Bridge have been released from the hospital, an official said Monday.

 

Four California Highway Patrol officers, a Golden Gate Bridge patrol officer and a bridge tow truck driver were exposed to a chemical substance believed to be fentanyl while attempting to aid the driver of a car who stopped Sunday on the San Francisco bridge, said CHP Officer Andrew Barclay.

 

All six were transported to Marin General Hospital for exposure to the substance. The first officer that came in contact with the unconscious driver was convulsing and vomiting on the ground. The others were treated for nausea, vomiting, dizziness, vision changes, and other symptoms consistent with fentanyl exposure, Barclay said.

 

All had been released by Monday, he said.

 

Authorities received reports of a drunken driver swerving erratically before stopping on the south end of the bridge Sunday, Barclay said.

 

One of the officers who found the driver unconscious was also rendered unconscious by a “white powdery substance” found in the car, he said.

 

“Two others on the scene — a CHP officer and a tow-truck driver — tried to help the first officer out of the car, and administered Narcan,” Barclay said, referring to a nasal spray used to reverse the effects of narcotics and prevent overdoses.

 

The unconscious driver was also given Narcan and taken to a hospital. The driver was also released from the hospital and has since been booked into jail for DUI and possession of a controlled substance, Barclay said.

 

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