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Nice work. 

Can I ask Is there is a reason why you chose to secure it towards the rear of the deck? Maybe it is just me being o.c.d.but, I always load bikes up ahead of the rear end where it wont get bounced around too much. 


PROFESSIONAL TOWING & RECOVERY IS NOT JUST A JOB.. IT IS A LIFESTYLE

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Looks great!

Personally I don’t worry about pulling them forward either. Once secured properly on the condor. Then safety straps to the deck, it’s not going anywhere.


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Njsss ... Thanks for sharing a great example of loading with a Condor type cycle-loader, and, employing a well-placed, six-point tie-down. When it comes to big bikes, I'm a firm believe MORE IS BETTER when securing a motorcyle for transport. I've used the Condor loader on all my carrier with great results. I feel the loader provides better stability, single operator load capability AND no customers on the deck. For the cost of a Condor, it'll pay for itself time over time versus an operator trying to wrastle a #400-pound fat bob or a #950-pound Goldwing. Plus, what you get from a tipped over motorcycle is typically a driver injured having wrenched their back trying to keep a #900-pounder +/- from falling. I, like Grumps, tend to positioned the bike as far forward (to the winch) as possible to prevent potential tip-over from a really bumpy ride. It's an unproved tale that suggests the bumpiest ride on an empty truck is behind the rear axle. I don't think it's an OCD thing, but perhaps how one was initially trained? I also think it depends on the overall length of the rear ratchet straps? If you have 8-foot straps, there's not be enough length to load way forward (buy the 12-long straps to allow forward pull). Adding a Condor to the mix is money well spent over the long-run.       R.


Randall C. Resch

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Agreed Mr. Resch, This is a very nice example of having the right gear for the job. 

I also agree once it is secured, it doesnt matter if it is up front or to the rear, It wont go anywhere. I just feel it gets beat up more on the tailboard. No right or wrong in it at all. It is just a preference thing for me of course.  


PROFESSIONAL TOWING & RECOVERY IS NOT JUST A JOB.. IT IS A LIFESTYLE

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Thanks

 

500+ lbs. won’t effect truck or bed but loading over axle is correct

 

Actually believe the effects of towing a motorcycle(irregardless of placement)are greater than actually riding one?

How about a self loader with motorcycle attachment?365D8A0D-D286-47C8-9D6C-8FD4D69DDAFB.thumb.jpeg.deba972aa1e550e97e5cf3d3c2ad3d04.jpeg

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Nice job with the loader attachment NJsss. May I add one-more consideration of focus would be the "Over-hang law", to the rear of the tow truck's tailboard. Most states have that four-foot to rear requirement beyond the truck's rear lights. With the motorcycle in-place on the wheellift, it extends easily beyond four feet from the lights. May I suggest adding extension lights to the wheellift as shown in the photo. By adding extension lights, your have satisfied the vehicle's code requirement, "beyond the vehicle's rear lights," and still have four feet extension beyond that.

 

While application in this manner creatively cheats the Letter of the Law, at least it meets the Spirit of the Law where most highway patrol officers and city police won't write the citation for the section. When installed on a carrier's wheellift, you add four more feet of lighting rearward when a long limousine, sailboat, or a dually truck is atop the carrier's deck. In California, towers get over-hang tickets all the time and this is a typical way to cheat the specific wording of the vehicle code. Just r emember to wrap all the excess wire so it doesn't hit the ground. If the wire does drop, your extension lights become drag lights. It's easy to apply and provides a good defense if you're struck from behind.         R.

 

 

 

How to extend extension lights.JPG

Edited by rreschran
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Randall C. Resch

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