Quantcast
Jump to content

Orcas Tow

Level III Patron
  • Content Count

    2,103
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    20

Orcas Tow last won the day on August 16 2020

Orcas Tow had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

105 Excellent

About Orcas Tow

  • Rank
    Distinguished

Personal Information

  • Location
    ORCAS ISLAND, WA

Recent Profile Visitors

2,735 profile views
  1. I remember it was not too long ago you "Couldn't do that with a flatbed";). Thanks for sharing & be safe out there, lots of nutty people.
  2. Nice thorough job on the recovery & restoration. Thanks, for sharing.
  3. Yes a bit of difficulty prior to pull, I had to pull the SUV forward rather than slide sideways as I wanted it to roll over the rock that was under the fuel tank with the drivers rear tire rather than drag it & take a chance of puncturing the tank. When I arrived the SUV was in 4x4 low & I could not get the trans in neutral to roll it so we rigged for a drag forward.
  4. Not sure why but this forum always says files are too big so here's a link.... https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=3801249493251398&id=101133003263084&comment_id=3801265766583104&notif_id=1607485621993488&notif_t=feed_comment&ref=notif
  5. It does not run, bought recently locally & broke down where it sits. I hope to be able to run air & pull shaft on scene without drama, forking from the front sounds like the way to go if the rails are not covered with fire dept doodads:)
  6. I have a request to impound this 1968 Seagrave Fire Truck from the Park Service day after tomorrow. Its on a different Island requiring a ferry ride away so I can not lay eyes on it to get a game plan. Ill be taking my 1981 KW W900A tandem with a 750 Holmes/Z20 Zacklift. Hoping for some old schoolers here to advise: Air or hydraulic brakes? Not sure if its auto or manual transmission, pull the shaft with either way on this old dog? Id love to grab it by the rear but unsure of frame strength near the rear bumper for forking? Thank you.
  7. These are crossed under the underlift, this is on my flatbed so the wheel lift is out quite a ways to clear the deck giving the appearance they aren't. I had to load on a ferry boat with this one that has about a 2-3 foot drop at the loading ramp depending on the tide hence the high wheel lift height pictured. I agree crossed safety chains allow more turning slack & would hold the casualty in the lane behind the truck better than un crossed.
  8. Every time, in addition I secure the steering wheel in the straight ahead position. I am in an area where we have narrow winding country roads with a high center crown & if you do not strap or secure the steering wheel the dollies will wander with the road crown or while going around a sharp turn at speed. I use the same ratchet & 2" laso strap on the dollies as the strap pictured on the wheel lift. I run Collins & ITD, they all get straps.
  9. Yes, once installed properly they work well for applying the brakes on the towed truck. Make sure your secure & adjusted properly as if your relying on it to work & it doesnt or your set up too tight & dragging the towed trucks brakes then your worse off than not having a brake buddy.
  10. I would tow it from the back for a short tow. 500 miles I would pull the shaft & pick it from the front, more front axle weight on your wrecker, less strain on the wheel lift, more control/stability towing.
  11. Agreed, only on the real heavy stuff or if Im going to be towing down a steep grade
  12. Good job on the pre hook observations & customer notifications
  13. Ive used these a few times for loading dollies on uneven surfaces, flats, etc... a quick throw down of these chocks & I dont see having to sling a heavy floor jack to set a wheel in dollies ever again, makes me happy:)
  14. Agreed, I run my tie down chain in between above the spring between the fork & spring eye to take up the gap then under the crossbar & to a chain binder. Get the pin in the lowest hole to make it as slop less as possible.
×
×
  • Create New...