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Orcas Tow

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Orcas Tow last won the day on August 16

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About Orcas Tow

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  1. Yes, once installed properly they work well for applying the brakes on the towed truck. Make sure your secure & adjusted properly as if your relying on it to work & it doesnt or your set up too tight & dragging the towed trucks brakes then your worse off than not having a brake buddy.
  2. I would tow it from the back for a short tow. 500 miles I would pull the shaft & pick it from the front, more front axle weight on your wrecker, less strain on the wheel lift, more control/stability towing.
  3. Agreed, only on the real heavy stuff or if Im going to be towing down a steep grade
  4. Good job on the pre hook observations & customer notifications
  5. Ive used these a few times for loading dollies on uneven surfaces, flats, etc... a quick throw down of these chocks & I dont see having to sling a heavy floor jack to set a wheel in dollies ever again, makes me happy:)
  6. Agreed, I run my tie down chain in between above the spring between the fork & spring eye to take up the gap then under the crossbar & to a chain binder. Get the pin in the lowest hole to make it as slop less as possible.
  7. I had a couple hours today & started the first set of 4 for both my wreckers. Started out with a 3x3 angle iron, had some 1/4" T100 plate, cut the T100 4" long x 4" wide, put some teeth on one edge, was going to weld but though it better to bolt first in case something needed adjusting down the road. Left a bit of the T100 hanging over the top of the angle so the dolly bar could not over ride. It appears from a couple tests that they work great for chip seal, gravel or dirt but would probably skip on concrete like pictured, The small rubber chocks work well on the concrete, so Ill have both on hand. I also loaded loaded images over at my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/Orcas-Auto-Tech-Inc-DBA-Orcas-Towing-101133003263084/photos/?tab=album&album_id=3583004888409194
  8. I agree & have used stands or blocking for the seesaw method in the past but Im nervous doing that method with many of todays frameless vehicles unless it was a total, also a level road on my narrow mountainous road island is a rarity.
  9. Yes, that's similar to what I use now, mine are a bit smaller & works most of the time, Im hoping to find something that works 100% of the time without fail. I had a Volvo wagon wreck the other night on a steep incline that was well off the roadway & had to be recovered to the road. Being a small owner operator I very rarely have backup & very rarely go back for the flatbed after recovery as our island roads are narrow & windy with many blind corners so leaving a wreck in the roadway for any length of time is asking for a secondary accident. The Volvo had flats front & rear with one front lower control arm ripped from the mounts. I picked the front & dollied the back, I spent a few extra minutes trying to keep the cross bar planted when pushing the flat up on the bar, a few minutes extra is too many in our world.
  10. Theres times when you need to load a rig with a flat on dollies, I have a small rubber triangular chock that I set under the rear dolly cross bar, push the flat on top of the rear cross bar, install front cross bar tight then roll the flat in-between the bars, set up dollies & go. Sometimes that rubber chock/dolly bar slides as Im trying to push the flat up on the rear bar. I'm going to fabricate a spike or steel wedge that will bite the road for loading flats on dollies. Something simple, a piece of angle iron with a tab on the top ramp so it prevents the cross bar from sliding & over the angle. Anyone seen one made before? Ill share when Im done & have perfected;)
  11. Planetary = fast line speed, worm = slow line speed but fabled stronger than planetary. Ive had both & now all my hydraulic trucks are planetary. I cant say that I have ever had to leave anything behind with a planetary, Ive had to use snatch blocks now & then but I prefer planetary, nothing like waiting on a slooooow worm gear winch to wind in 100' of wire rope working on a busy roadway.
  12. Aaron Widmar Aaron is unashamed to be a native Clevelander and the proud driver of a Hyundai Veloster Turbo (which recently replaced his 1995 Saturn SC-2). He gleefully utilizes his background in theater, literature, and communication to dramatically recite his own articles to nearby youth. Mr. Widmar happily resides in Dayton, Ohio with his magnificent wife, Vicki, but is often on the road with her exploring new destinations. Aaron has high aspirations for his writing career but often gets distracted pondering the profound nature of the human condition and forgets what he was writing… See more articles by Aaron. Well this explains a lot...should gleefully stick to theater.
  13. Living on an island I try to make the most of the ferry ride to the mainland by taking 2 at a time. I carry In The Ditch dollies with the 4.80 tires in the toolbox pictured, they just barely fit & both fit in one 48" toolbox which I had to search for the right box with the proper inside dimensions & style, dolly cross bars in the tray on top of the boxes. For me they mean a double payday or not if I didn't have them.
  14. All good info. In addition I am lucky to have great support from our local Fire Department & Sheriffs Office for traffic control on our narrow country roads. There has not been a time where one or both agencies have not responded to my request for traffic control or for shutting down one or both lanes. Agreed on the wheel chock, There is one on the passenger side rear of the truck for the standard rollover as it was on a grade, the reverse was on level ground, either way the parking brake & Mico Lock brakes are always set as redundancy in this truck. Nothing like training in private so you don't endanger or make a fool of yourself in public:)
  15. Great Family history, thanks for sharing.
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