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  1. Great winter socks for boots!
  2. I am here somewhere... trying to find myself but 'here' at least in spirit.
  3. Just three batteries. I believe they are AAA. Single arrow: http://internationaltowingmuseum.org/product/move-over-arrow/ Case: http://internationaltowingmuseum.org/product/move-over-arrow-case/
  4. CHATTANOOGA, TN, May 29, 2019 -- The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum today announced that it recently completed an agreement to sell portable, lighted safety arrows. The effort, intended to complement the Survivor Fund, continues the museum’s efforts to raise awareness about the dangers of the towing and road service profession. The safety arrows are designed to alert approaching motorists as to which direction they should take to safely maneuver around a roadside incident or breakdown scene. The arrows can be mounted on the rear of a vehicle using embedded earth magnets, or on a window that is rolled down slightly, and positioned to direct motorists to the left or right side of a scene. Designed for maximum visibility, each arrow has a reflective tape border and powerful LED lights that can be set to steady or flashing. The arrows can be folded down to fit inside a glovebox or console, and unfolded to the arrow shape, or to fit inside a standard roadside triangle. “Users of our safety arrows have called them the Slow Down Move Over Arrow because of how effective they are in establishing a path for motorists,” stated Fred Devries, whose company produces and distributes the product. “As we work to honor the men and women lost on our highways with things like the Survivor Fund and the Wall of the Fallen, it is equally important we look for ways to prevent such tragedies in the first place,” commented Jeffrey Godwin, 1st vice president of the museum and co-chair of the Survivor Fund and Wall of the Fallen. “Just looking at this valuable, yet simple, technology it is easy to see it will save lives.” Through a special exclusive arrangement for the towing industry, the museum will receive special pricing to enjoy a generous profit to be divided between the museum and the Survivor Fund. The arrows are available at the museum in Chattanooga and will be available on the museum online gift shop at www.towingmuseum.com beginning next week. Orders can also be made in the interim by calling the museum at 423-267-3132. Arrows are $40 each and are available in cases of 18 for $30 each. Case shipping is $27 making the total price for a case, including shipping, $567.00. About ITRHFM The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum, located in Chattanooga, TN, houses an array of displays and exhibits showcasing the history of towing and recovery. The rotating collection includes early equipment by Manley, Holmes, Vulcan, and Weaver. The Hall of Fame honors individuals who have significantly advanced the industry. The Museum includes a theater, a library, and a gift shop selling souvenirs related to the towing industry. On the outside grounds is the Wall of the Fallen memorial, dedicated to towers who died in the line of service. The ITRHFM Survivor Fund assists the families of the men and women that have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of service by providing a uniform financial gift at the time of their loss. ITRHFM is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization and accepts donations for its programs and operations from individuals, corporations and groups. Learn more at www.towingmuseum.com.
  5. Hello TowForce! How about a been there, done that.
  6. We are also updating those statistics to be more relevant to your businesses. I expect you will see a change in how we present the rates and such in July.
  7. Chattanooga, TN – April 30, 2018 – At its winter meeting, the board of directors of the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum (ITRHFM), applied its financial stewardship formula and reset the death benefit of the Survivor Fund pending an additional moth of fundraising. At the recent USAC/MD Golf Classic held in conjunction with the Florida Tow Show, it was announced that the board approved an increase in the death benefit paid to each approved application from $3,000 per incident to $5,000 per incident. If the deceased was employed by a company who was a member in good standing of the museum, or if the deceased was a member in good standing, the benefit increases to $7,500, up from $5,000. "We are blessed with a healthy financial position provided by the generosity of our industry,” said Jeffrey Godwin, Survivor Fund Committee Co-Chairman. “With an eye toward long term support of the industry, we implemented a formula a few years ago to drive our giving. The result is one where the support of the Survivor Fund by our industry has allowed us to make a significant increase to the amount we are able to provide families going forward.” The Survivor Fund is supported by individual operators, towing and road service companies of all sizes, motor clubs, industry suppliers and many more. The pledge program for the Survivor Fund works to replenish funds paid out at the time of industry tragedies and provides stability allowing increases to the benefit by gaining support from contributions as simple as those where individuals and companies pledge as little as $5 per death. “It is our hope that all companies across our industry will become members of the museum to preserve our history and to provide this meaningful protection for the families of their employees,” said Lee Roberts, Survivor Fund Committee Co-Chairman. The Survivor Fund, founded in 2006 and managed by the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum, was started to offer financial support to the families that have lost a loved one in the line of service within industry. Since 2006 the Survivor Fund has approved and paid out hundreds of claims to support families in their time of need due to tragic accidents. The ITRHFM is working to build a perpetual fund while also supporting families as the fund is built. Increases in benefits to families are made based on the fundraising of the Survivor Fund and the increased security of the Fund based on its investment health. About ITRHFM The International Towing & Recovery Hall of Fame & Museum hosts the Wall of the Fallen Memorial, the only one in the world for the towing industry. It was unveiled September 22, 2006. The museum is located at 3315 Broad St., Chattanooga, TN. Learn more about the museum, the Survivor Fund and the Wall of the Fallen at www.towingmuseum.com.
  8. Topic recreated from an Article Discussion on Tow411, August 2006: This is the last installment of this series as recently published in the towPartners Advisor… COMMUNICATION Nothing, and I do mean nothing, is more critical to the success of a dispatcher than communication. It is essential within the dispatch room, between dispatch and customer service, between dispatch and the driver staff, between dispatch and other departments, and mostly, between dispatch and the customers. If there is one recurring complaint common to any service business, and especially the towing business, it is that of the customer saying, “If you had only told me…..” • “If you had only told me that the driver would be here in 10 minutes, I would not have been angry.” • “If you had only told me that my expectations were unreasonable, we could have worked something out.” • “If you had only told me that the driver was in an accident, I would have called my customer and told them you were running behind. Now my customer is mad at me too.” • “If you had only told me that you could not do it, I would have used someone else.” • “If you had only told me that you could not guarantee making the ETA, I would have called my friend for a ride and left the car for you.” All of these examples have actually happened, but the list of “If you’s…” regularly receives new additions. The need for communication is amplified when one realizes that any time you are near someone, talking with someone, or listening to someone, you are communicating. As you walk down the hallway, you communicate a great deal through the pace of your step, your posture, and the items that you carry. As you speak on the phone, the tone of your voice, the expression with which you speak, your clarity and volume all communicate something to the listening party. It is this something that breeds confidence, instills trust, and confirms aptitude. There’s an old adage that “it’s not what you say, but how you say it that matters”. That does not apply exactly to a dispatcher, because he must know about that which he speaks, or he will not be successful. But the point is well made. A dispatcher can tell a customer that you are unable to meet their needs in a matter that will not close the door for negotiation. For example, if a customer calls with a request to have a truck on-site within 15 minutes, a dispatcher can respond that the correct truck may take as long as 25 minutes, but he will do his best to get it done quickly. It will take no more than 30 minutes for sure. Realize for a moment that the dispatcher has doubled the time to get to the customer. But he has stated it in such a manner that the customer is presented with an option of calling another service, or going with a definite 30 minute arrival time. Most times, they will opt for the sure thing because all they wanted in the first place was to have the truck on-site as quickly as humanly possible. Let’s consider what happens if the dispatcher communicates differently. For instance, in the case above, if the dispatcher flatly tells the customer that their wish is not humanly possible. Or tells the customer that too many drivers called in sick today. Or tells them that it is too busy to accommodate the request. Or tells the customer that if they wants it done quickly, then maybe they should buy a tow truck! (Don’t laugh as it has happened!) Please understand that the emphasis in communication is on presentation. If no driver is available to run a call, the dispatcher needs to know. But the dispatcher does not need to tell the customer. Rather, tell the customer, "The soonest I can get a driver to your location will be _____ minutes. Is that soon enough?” Too many times, a customer is made to feel like an inconvenience. If a customer is made to feel this way, they will not be a customer for long. Would you? Be honest with the customer. Tell them whether or not you can meet their needs. But tell them in a way that they are not exposed to all of the shortcomings of the company. Interacting directly with the customer over the phone is the nearest a dispatcher will get to shaking the customer’s hand. After the next call from a customer, ask yourself, “Did I communicate to that customer that I appreciate their business and I will do everything I can to meet their needs?” If you can answer “yes” to that question, then you are effectively communicating with the customer. You are always communicating. What’s your message? CONCENTRATION Where is the key to the filing cabinet? What time is Bob coming in today? Where is that pen I loaned you last week? Do you know where Charlotte is? Do you have change for a dollar? Have you seen Joe’s new tattoo? Did you hear who won the football game last night? Are we busy today? Who is in truck 24? Do these questions sound familiar? Anyone who has worked in an office for more than 10 minutes can testify that they are part of the everyday routine. For a dispatcher, they are more than an interruption. They are disastrous. They are landmines in a dispatcher’s mental map. One question can cause a catastrophic derailment in a dispatcher’s train of thought. Webster’s defines concentration as the act of coming to or drawing toward a common center; focusing. A dispatcher who is distracted is like a person with the wrong pair of eyeglasses. No matter how they struggle, they are prohibited from clear vision because of what they are looking through. GOOD DISPATCHING REQUIRES CONCENTRATION! A successful dispatcher crafts his work as he goes through the day. He assigns a call to one driver, and removes a call from another. He sends a message to a driver about his status, while listening on the radio to a traffic report about an accident on a major freeway, all the time planning for his next dispatch. A customer calls for an ETA, while another driver calls for help on the radio. Meanwhile, two lines are ringing on the dispatch phone, while another customer calls wondering what happened to their car from yesterday because the service advisor can’t find it. All of these encounters are not interruptions. They demand resolution. All of these encounters are part of the job of a dispatcher. Any peripheral question, comment, dilemma, or situation is a distraction from the task of dispatching. And any interruption in a dispatchers thought process could result in an error in his dispatch process. To say it briefly….distractions are death to a dispatcher. If you go into an arcade at a mall, you expect to be bombarded with visual and audio stimuli. The same is true in the dispatch room. The key to a dispatcher’s success lies in his ability to distinguish between those things that are necessary for the performance of his job, and those things that only act to distract him. This can be accomplished by focusing on several topics previously discussed. Control those distractions which you are able, and eliminate them if possible. Keep everyone out of dispatch except dispatchers. When possible, direct phone calls to those people who are not responsible for the assignment of calls. Come up with creative ideas about ways of eliminating distractions. Communicate through e-mail or other means to your supervisor that you are too distracted. Communicate to the driver staff what you consider to be interruptions and what you consider to be helpful inquires and calls. Confront others who inhibit your ability to concentrate. A dispatcher must see with clarity, think with quickness, and concentrate with completeness. CONCLUSION If you think that the perfect dispatcher is a combination of Mozart, Roger Staubach, Bobby Fisher, Monet, Ross Perot, Will Rogers, Ghandi and Zig Ziglar, I commend you. You understand what has been written. You recognize the challenge of your task. Now…enjoy the Art of Dispatching. Dispatch is not a color. It is a painting. Dispatch is not a sentence. It is a story. Dispatch is not an idea. It is a philosophy. Dispatch is not a procedure. It is a process. To see all of the Art of Dispatch articles, visit the towPartners Document Library. Hope you enjoy these articles... More to come. -Jeffrey Godwin Dispatcher35 said: Having worked as a Dispatcher for the last 5+ years I can’t agree more with Jeff’s statements about concentration. At my last job, I can’t count on both hands and feet the number of times in a day I was interrupted to deal with things that had nothing to do with dispatching: The Audi dealer is out front with parts and needs to be paid. Could you stop what you’re doing and write him a check because the bookkeeper is out today because it’s that time of the month again. (Gee, I don’t remember getting a day off because it was “that time of the month”.) Why did Mr. Jones drop off his Chevy this morning? What is that VW parked in the space out front? Gee the Service Manager is busy, could you call the dealer and order a belt for Mrs. Johnson's car? Could you please call Mr. Smith and tell him he can pick up his car? Ok, you as the boss might walk in and see the Dispatcher on the ‘net but I know that 99% of the time I was on the net I was: &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp Looking up directions on Mapquest &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp Checking towspecs.com for a driver Reading the previous day’s police log for details on cars towed in the previous night. Now that I dispatch strictly from my house and don’t have to deal with all the useless interruptions things go a lot better. The Dispatcher is there to dispatcher. He / She is not the lot person, the bookkeeper, the parts person or any other job in your company
  9. Chattanooga, Tenn., March 26, 2018 -- The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum today announced that it has completed the selection process for induction into the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame as the Class of 2018. Michael Aspesi (Southborough, MA), Scott Burrows (Pendleton, KY), John Coldwell (Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England), Rene Fortin (Manchester, NH), Danny Horton (Haymarket, VA), Cynthia Martineau (Leominster, MA), Glenn Neal (Vacaville, CA), and Geri Roskopf (Menomonee Falls, WI) were nominated by members of the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum for their many contributions to the towing and recovery industry, their families and communities. “Our Hall of Fame is not about single events or simply participating but is instead about celebrating those who have worked hard to support and grow our industry’s professionalism,” said Bill Gratzianna, President of the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum. “This year’s group of inductees is no exception in their work on behalf of the industry and their leadership inside and outside of the industry.” The Class of 2018, will be inducted into the Hall of Fame, in a ceremony to be held at 6pm on September 15th, 2018 at the Chattanoogan Hotel in Chattanooga, TN. A full weekend of activities will be held to celebrate this year’s inductees. For more information on the induction ceremony, or to order tickets, contact the museum at 423-267-3132 or visit them on the internet at towingmuseum.com. About ITRHFM The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum, located in Chattanooga, TN, houses an array of displays and exhibits showcasing the history of towing and recovery. The rotating collection includes early equipment by Manley, Holmes, Vulcan, and Weaver. The Hall of Fame honors individuals who have significantly advanced the industry. The Museum includes a theater, a library, and a gift shop selling souvenirs related to the towing industry. On the outside grounds is the Wall of the Fallen memorial, dedicated to towers who died in the line of service. The ITRHFM Survivor Fund assists the families of the men and women that have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of service by providing a uniform financial gift at the time of their loss. ITRHFM is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization and accepts donations for its programs and operations from individuals, corporations and groups. Learn more at www.towingmuseum.com.
  10. January 25, 2018 | Chattanooga, TN | The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum today announced that Omadi presented a donation of $8,178.47 to the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum’s Survivor Fund during the recent American Towman Exhibition in Baltimore. Last year Omadi committed to donating a portion of every tow completed in their towing management platform to the Survivor Fund. Omadi felt that because tow operators put their life on the line every time they step out on the roadside, that they should reciprocate in kind. The funds will provide financial support to families of those lost in the line of service. “As we’ve worked with tow operators across the country we’ve gotten to know these wonderful individuals not simply as clients but as friends. It pains us anytime we hear that one of these dedicated professionals loses their life while in the line of duty and we hope that our donation helps to relieve some of their families financial burdens,” said Charles Lukens, CEO of Omadi. The Survivor Fund helps provide immediate financial help to families affected by tragedy in the line of service and Omadi is proud to support the efforts of the Survivor Fund. Omadi plans to continue to help alleviate some of the financial burdens felt by loved ones of those who have passed away in the line of duty as well as bring more exposure to the Survivor Fund and the issues that cause towing operator deaths. “Omadi stepped up to the plate in an important way by generously offering to donate to the Survivor Fund based on their business volumes,” said Jeffrey Godwin, ITRHFM First Vice President and Survivor Fund Committee Co-Chairman. “Support from the Omadi organization is a welcome addition to our efforts to support the families of the men and women lost in our industry.” On average, close to 60 road service professionals are killed each year assisting stranded motorists on the side of busy roadways or performing their duties in towing and recovery. The Survivor Fund, founded in 2006 and managed by the International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum, was started to offer financial support to the families that have lost a loved one in the line of service within the industry. Since its inception, the Survivor Fund has approved and paid out well over 150 claims to support families in their time of need due to tragic accidents. About ITRHFM The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum, located in Chattanooga, TN, houses an array of displays and exhibits showcasing the history of towing and recovery. The rotating collection includes early equipment by Manley, Holmes, Vulcan, and Weaver. The Hall of Fame honors individuals who have significantly advanced the industry. The Museum includes a theater, a library, and a gift shop selling souvenirs related to the towing industry. On the outside grounds is the Wall of the Fallen memorial, dedicated to towers who died in the line of service. The ITRHFM Survivor Fund assists the families of the men and women that have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of service by providing a uniform financial gift at the time of their loss. ITRHFM is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization and accepts donations for its programs and operations from individuals, corporations and groups. To learn more, visit www.towingmuseum.com. About Omadi, Inc. Omadi is a towing management software that connects the towing ecosystem & provides Organized, Managed & Driven Improvement (OMADI). The Omadi software platform was built to help towing companies to take full control of their business and allows them to be more efficient by tracking, analyzing, and enhancing their workflow. Omadi enables towing companies to streamline their processes and increases productivity while improving communication and replacing the need for multiple software solutions.
  11. Sorry Ron & Co have so much work to do in this move. Merry Christmas all.
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